A TALE OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

By Gilbert Tsala Ekani, US Africa News. Updated 2015-10-09

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A TALE OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
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Saddam Hussein was certainly not a great democrat. But in his time, no one could amuse themselves by exploding bombs in Iraq. The perpetrator would have been stopped fast enough before there could be a repeat performance. It is said that even Saddam's mustache was a massive deterrent. It was enough that on spotting you, his mustache would twitch little to keep everyone in line; if not convinced of the benefits of peace, they were at least fearful, and remained quiet.

 

The Americans came and debunked this myth with abandon; the statues of Saddam Hussein were toppled at the same time as his regime. Their rationale: he was a dictator who moreover had weapons of mass destruction. It emerged later that the story of weapons of mass destruction was a big lie. Saddam Hussein was caught like a rat and executed. But ever since, democracy has been stalled; security is an illusion; the country is divided between militias and chieftains. The Americans are almost gone after burning through billions of dollars--a complete waste. From wherever he is, Saddam Hussein must be having a good laugh.

 

In Afghanistan, the Taliban were considered a nuisance. They forbid music; closely monitor the women’s clothing so that each is hidden behind a nearly full veil. The Taliban had the misfortune of harboring Osama Bin Laden, regarded by the Americans as a great master of international terrorism. It was necessary to eliminate bin Laden, but the Taliban did not intend to let him go, because he was their guest. The Americans therefore pummeled Afghanistan to track down Bin Laden and chase the Taliban. The Taliban (to some extent) hid, and Bin Laden fled to Pakistan where he was killed in his bed. An American-style democracy was installed, mainly in Kabul, capital of Afghanistan. The rest of the country lives in a kind of armed peace. The last Taliban strike in Kunduz shows they are not far away and that they are even willing to return. Time is on their side. Unlike the Americans, who have begun to find the time wearying, who spend unthinkingly, and whose soldiers are sacrificed for a nebulous issue in a distant country.

 

In Syria, Bashar Assad, the worthy heir of his father, installed a strong regime in Damascus. As with his father before him, some have dared to call Bashar the butcher of Damascus. In fact he is a surgeon. But apparently, he often operates without anesthesia. After having been highly praised, and after having made a bulwark against terrorist groups, Westerners are discovering that Mr. Assad is a dictator who must be removed from power. Terrorist groups have the same ambition. So, Assad and his troops have been strafed from all sides. Westerners wish to try him for crimes against humanity. The Americans are bombing a good part of Syria on the grounds of hunting down terrorists of the Islamic State.

 

 

The French are also entering the fray. But Assad does not only have enemies. The Russians are on his side, and President Putin lectured his Western counterparts: you are not Syrian and it is not up to you to choose the Syrian president. And so the affair takes on the aspect of East-West confrontation. Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq--three countries where democracy is struggling to establish itself. But also three martyred countries which are not close to finding peace.

 

 

 
 
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