ROUND UP IN CAEMC SUB-REGION

By Jean Réné Meva’a Amougou , US Africa News. Updated 2016-02-25

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ROUND UP IN CAEMC SUB-REGION
The Presidents of CAEMC

"Political marketing is a constant. Those who only remember it the month before the election, whether municipal, senatorial, or presidential will discover the reality. “They are perhaps arriving too late, on territory that’s already been staked and combed through by a political party which is constantly in the field," the Communications Secretary of the Central Committee of the Cameroon People's Democratic Movement (CPDM) remarked in the columns of the government newspaper.  It’s easy to believe that the overabundance of “calls” for candidates crystallize the fantasies of presidential entourages. It even imposes a modulation of political spaces in the sub region. “This seems to be a necessary step to prepare the ground and calibrate the campaign," says Professor Zambo Belinga, a political scientist. For the different polls results, the cursor has not moved. On the airwaves of public broadcasters in different countries, reports flow in honor of candidate presidents. Experts propound in the newspaper arms of these same media. In the public arena, posters make an impression, creating memory routines. In this extraordinary celebration (punctuated with hymns in praise of the president), everything is good in order to divide the country. Following along, one is again led through a series of digressions of which it seems hardly sensible to try to make sense of in the end. “A Priori: everything is true, although truncated or augmented,” states Professor Belinga. It’s that everything in reality descends to a thematic fetish around addictions and popular sentiments, delaying the «good actions» to infinity. 

 

Credos

 

This is what has happened in recent weeks:

 

In Chad, before the militants of theMPS (Patriotic Salvation Movement), Idriss Deby declared: “You do me the great honor of renewing your trust in me by investing me again as your candidate for the 2016 presidential poll.” The former Chadian dictator, Hussein Habre, who was defeated in 1990, responded as a part of his party. It did not deviate much:  “We are only waiting for this Congress to invest our founding president for next April’s presidential election. He deserves to continue to run the country, because nobody can do it like him, we will always pray to God to help him manage Chad. He is a good president who has what is needed for Chad”. Eventually, and with the assistance of the public media, all MPS regional offices have chosen the head of state as their candidate.

 

At the opening of the third Extraordinary Congress of the Democratic Party of Equatorial Guinea (PDGE) of which he is president, Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo declared: “I have received the approval of all activists to be a candidate in the next presidential election”. Lately Equatorial Guinea’s head of state has his unconditional fans and apologists throughout the country. Even if they have the trouble clearly defining how the candidacy of Mathias Nguema’s successor is new.

 

In Congo, an editorial frenzy sprung up at the end of the Second Extraordinary Session of the steering committee of the Assembly for Democracy and Social Progress (RDPS), held on January 12, in Pointe-Noire. On this occasion, Denis Sassou-Nguesso was presented as the man of the hour by Alain Moka and Jean-Pierre Manoukou Kouba, members of the PCT (Congolese Party of Labour) Politburo. “You know that the international situation is very delicate. There is wind and storm. It is necessary to have someone who is able to take the boat and bring it safely to port, and that is Denis Sassou-Nguesso,” declared Alain Moka. For his party it is “an act of loyalty and responsibility. The Head of State embodies the Assembly, peace, and national unity.” As in 1992, 2002, and 2009, President Sassou-Nguesso will be the candidate of the PCT in the next presidential election. Thus, he will run for a third term on March 20, as allowed by the new constitution that came into force last November.

 

In Cameroon, things have been spinning since last year. Increasingly, the machine of President Paul Biya’s campaign is infiltrating public opinion. The cadence of appeals is in unison in the CPDM. The party activists have engaged in a rich flow of thoughts to answer to the broader question of the candidacy of Paul Biya. Senators, CPDM officials, artists, and other cronies of the Etoudi power have decided: Paul Biya still deserves to lead the country and the presidential election in Cameroon must be anticipated. In this momentum, fed by 33 years of their candidate’s tenure in power, they describe with skill and accuracy the trajectories of the current Cameroon head of state: “He has quietly led the country; he is the architect of the Cameroon that will emerge in 2035 ...”

 

 

 

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